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  • ADour
    ADour closed this thread because:
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    03:52, December 7, 2018
    Stan Lee Meets the Amazing Spider-Man Vol 1 1 Textless



    As you might already be aware of, yesterday marked a sad day for the comic book community. Legendary creator Stan Lee passed away at the age of 95. Characterized by his exuberance, cadence and showmanship, Stan Lee marked a before and after in the history of comic books in the '60s.

    Together with his many contributors, including Jack Kirby, Steve Ditko and Don Heck, Stan Lee ushered a new era of this sequential medium, marked by the creation of a new type of superheroes that were human and flawed, and struggled with insecurities and the hardships of life while protecting the world and saving the innocent, breathing new life into this type of modern myths and bringing them closer to us.

    Through the Bullpen Bulletins and his famous Stan's Soapbox column, Stan also brought a new level of interactivity with readers, giving Marvel a friendly and chatty voice, and making his audience feel like part of a big family together with the Marvel bullpen.

    The library of characters co-created by Stan Lee is almost as big as his enthusiasm and warmth, and it includes heroes and villains such as the Fantastic Four, Spider-Man, Iron Man, Doctor Doom, the X-Men, the Hulk, Magneto, Black Panther, Daredevil and Doctor Strange. You can check all of the colorful characters he helped created here.

    We would like to use this space to commemorate the life and work of this visionary creator.

    Excelsior.

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    • Sorrowfully.

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    • Excelsior father

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    • A world without Stan Lee is unfathomable.

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    • I kinda hoped he'd at least make it to see the fourth Avengers film which will be the last cameo he played in.

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    • i m french and even in france Excelsior was my super hero

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    • He’s given so much (by so much, I mean the characters he created), and all he asked for in return is undying love from fans and family, which he got, and kept getting until the end of his days. At least he’s with his wife again.

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    • "You know, I guess one person can make a difference. 'Nuff said".

      - Stan Lee

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    • Frogoat wrote: A world without Stan Lee is unfathomable.

      That is true.

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    • Stan Lee was pretty much the greatest guy in the history of comics. He was my comic book hero: a real life superhero. He will be missed but never forgotten.

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    • The hero of many, thanks to him and Steve Ditko, I had a great childhood, adolescence and a new adult age. Goodbye Stan Lee PS: I am Spanish speaking, and I used the translator

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    • So sad, I've always wanted to meet Stan Lee, always. And now that he is gone, the only time i will be able to see him is when i die and go to heaven if at all. Stan definitely went to Heaven cause of all the good he did to entertain us and himself. He didn't deserve to die, i don't know anyone that hated him. Even his competitor (DC Comics) sent him respects for his death. If Disney doesn't put their heads together and start doing good for Marvel I will honestly get so mad at Disney.

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    • A creator of great stories. He will be missed.

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    • Let's lay it right on the line. Bigotry and racism are among the deadliest social ills plaguing the world today. But, unlike a team of costumed super-villains, they can’t be halted with a punch in the snoot, or a zap from a ray gun. The only way to destroy them is to expose them—to reveal them for the insidious evils they really are. The bigot is an unreasoning hater—one who hates blindly, fanatically, indiscriminately. If his hang-up is black men, he hates ALL black men. If a redhead once offended him, he hates ALL redheads. If some foreigner beat him to a job, he’s down on ALL foreigners. He hates people he’s never seen—people he’s never known—with equal intensity—with equal venom. Now, we’re not trying to say it’s unreasonable for one human being to bug another. But, although anyone has the right to dislike another individual, it's totally irrational, patently insane to condemn an entire race—to despise an entire nation—to vilify an entire religion. Sooner or later, we must learn to judge each other on our own merits. Sooner or later, if man is ever to be worthy of his destiny, we must fill out hearts with tolerance. For then, and only then, will we be truly worthy of the concept that man was created in the image of God–a God who calls us ALL—His children.

      -Stan Lee

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    • Nurdboy42 wrote:

      Let's lay it right on the line. Bigotry and racism are among the deadliest social ills plaguing the world today. But, unlike a team of costumed super-villains, they can’t be halted with a punch in the snoot, or a zap from a ray gun. The only way to destroy them is to expose them—to reveal them for the insidious evils they really are. The bigot is an unreasoning hater—one who hates blindly, fanatically, indiscriminately. If his hang-up is black men, he hates ALL black men. If a redhead once offended him, he hates ALL redheads. If some foreigner beat him to a job, he’s down on ALL foreigners. He hates people he’s never seen—people he’s never known—with equal intensity—with equal venom. Now, we’re not trying to say it’s unreasonable for one human being to bug another. But, although anyone has the right to dislike another individual, it's totally irrational, patently insane to condemn an entire race—to despise an entire nation—to vilify an entire religion. Sooner or later, we must learn to judge each other on our own merits. Sooner or later, if man is ever to be worthy of his destiny, we must fill out hearts with tolerance. For then, and only then, will we be truly worthy of the concept that man was created in the image of God–a God who calls us ALL—His children.

      -Stan Lee

      Another great piece of advice from Stan, showing his brilliance.

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    • I'm sure that I speak for everyone when I say, "Rest in peace, Stan Lee.". AdamDeanHall (talk) 17:53, November 13, 2018 (UTC)

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    • His passing doesn't come as a shock to me. He was 95 years old. He lived a long life. So some of the grief expressed above is histrionic in my opinion. Also, unlike most, his passing doesn't fill me with sadness.

      For myself, I enjoy some of the stories he wrote. However, they didn't speak to anything I couldn't already figure out on my own since by the time I read them they were already 30 years old and the world had moved on. I also don't mourn his loss. As I said before, he was 95, this should be a surprise to nobody. I also don't mourn his loss because he wasn't a very good person.

      Credit where credit is due: He changed the game. But let's not look at history with rose-colored glasses here. Stan, like the characters he wrote, was a flawed person and not everything he did was great.

      First of all: The person you're all mourning as Stan Lee was only a character, created and marketed. The Stan Lee you read in Stan's Soapbox or saw in cameos in Marvel movies, or any other public appearance was not the real guy. It was a character. Stan Lee was as much a trademark as Spider-Man (especially since he sold his likeness to Marvel). While the Stan Lee of the 60s was probably more genuine, the one that everyone here grew up with (in one capacity or another) was just a marketed image. It's funny how most people won't address him by his actual name in these eulogies. It was Stan Lieber. Stan Lieber was the man behind the name. Unlike Stan Lee, Stan Lieber was not always the praiseworthy person you all paint him to be.

      He screwed people over on creators rights -- especially his closest friends and collaborators, Jack Kirby and Steve Ditko among the biggest of them. If it weren't for those people, Stan wouldn't be the icon he is today.

      If you need more proof, this Wiki is falling over itself over Stan's passing, yet when Steve Ditko passed away back in June, the only real mention was someone put his death date in the profile. Ditko deserves more credit for his work than Stan, without a doubt. The fact that nobody made a thing about Steve's passing is disgusting in my mind, and everyone above should be a little ashamed of themselves for that fact.

      Steve (and Jack, and everyone who drew for Stan) were an integral part of the characters they co-created. This is because Stan could only write two types of characters: the brooding loner and the team that argues a lot but ultimately works together. Even then, of all the comics he wrote, I'd say that there are only 100 worth reading (and trust me, I've read them all). Even then less than 20 are what I would call legendary, brilliant, or even ahead of the times. His ideas were borrowed or outright stolen from other sources (the Fantastic Four were a rip off of the Challenger of the Unknown and Carl Burgo's Human Torch; the X-Men were a rip off of the Doom Patrol; Ant-Man was in response to the Atom; etc. etc.) I'm not saying this out of partisanship between one company or another. All of his creations were financially motivated. The Fantastic Four was pushed into publication because DC Comics was making a mint off of Justice League. However, what prevented these characters from being knock-offs and made them icons were the artists who brought them to life on the page.

      Sure, Stan said some things that needed to be said at the time they needed saying. He also breathed life into an industry that was still walking funny after being neutered by the Comics Authority Code. When it came to social issues he was quite vocal. However, as a businessman, he took all of the credit for everything while his co-creators languished in poverty, or died before they got their proper recognition. As a writer, he was derivative, especially of his own material.

      He was a guy who was in the right place at the right time. There's a reason why nobody thinks fondly of anything Stan created prior to 1961 and after 1968 -- because all the ideas were ranging from "meh" to "awful". If you don't believe me, look up Father Time, Stripperella, and "Just Imagine". He had a brief moment of positively received creativity and that was it. Why we choose to remember him in this way (As opposed to Steve Ditko, Jack Kirby, Archie Goodwin, Gene Colan, Herb Trimpe, Dave Cockrum, or any of the countless others who have died) is because Stan marketed and sold his own persona. He wasn't a person anymore, he made himself a product that could charge top dollar.

      I'm sorrynotsorry if this tramples on anyone's grief, but that's the reality of the guy. He wasn't perfect. He was an [butthole] and a crook sometimes. He said some really good things here and there and wrote a few good stories, but mourning him makes me feel sick because of who he became as a businessman and a person.

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    • I'd like to see you at a funeral...

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    • Nurdboy42 wrote: I'd like to see you at a funeral...

      Sorry, I don't subscribe to the idea that we only have to say nice things about a person just because they died. That goes double for someone who was in the public eye like Stan. He did some awful things. I think they merit mention as well as the good things he did.

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    • Though we lost an important name to us, the heavens now were blessed with his presence.

      EXCELSIOR

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    • Nausiated wrote: His passing doesn't come as a shock to me. He was 95 years old. He lived a long life. So some of the grief expressed above is histrionic in my opinion. Also, unlike most, his passing doesn't fill me with sadness.

      For myself, I enjoy some of the stories he wrote. However, they didn't speak to anything I couldn't already figure out on my own since by the time I read them they were already 30 years old and the world had moved on. I also don't mourn his loss. As I said before, he was 95, this should be a surprise to nobody. I also don't mourn his loss because he wasn't a very good person.

      Credit where credit is due: He changed the game. But let's not look at history with rose-colored glasses here. Stan, like the characters he wrote, was a flawed person and not everything he did was great.

      First of all: The person you're all mourning as Stan Lee was only a character, created and marketed. The Stan Lee you read in Stan's Soapbox or saw in cameos in Marvel movies, or any other public appearance was not the real guy. It was a character. Stan Lee was as much a trademark as Spider-Man (especially since he sold his likeness to Marvel). While the Stan Lee of the 60s was probably more genuine, the one that everyone here grew up with (in one capacity or another) was just a marketed image. It's funny how most people won't address him by his actual name in these eulogies. It was Stan Lieber. Stan Lieber was the man behind the name. Unlike Stan Lee, Stan Lieber was not always the praiseworthy person you all paint him to be.

      He screwed people over on creators rights -- especially his closest friends and collaborators, Jack Kirby and Steve Ditko among the biggest of them. If it weren't for those people, Stan wouldn't be the icon he is today.

      If you need more proof, this Wiki is falling over itself over Stan's passing, yet when Steve Ditko passed away back in June, the only real mention was someone put his death date in the profile. Ditko deserves more credit for his work than Stan, without a doubt. The fact that nobody made a thing about Steve's passing is disgusting in my mind, and everyone above should be a little ashamed of themselves for that fact.

      Steve (and Jack, and everyone who drew for Stan) were an integral part of the characters they co-created. This is because Stan could only write two types of characters: the brooding loner and the team that argues a lot but ultimately works together. Even then, of all the comics he wrote, I'd say that there are only 100 worth reading (and trust me, I've read them all). Even then less than 20 are what I would call legendary, brilliant, or even ahead of the times. His ideas were borrowed or outright stolen from other sources (the Fantastic Four were a rip off of the Challenger of the Unknown and Carl Burgo's Human Torch; the X-Men were a rip off of the Doom Patrol; Ant-Man was in response to the Atom; etc. etc.) I'm not saying this out of partisanship between one company or another. All of his creations were financially motivated. The Fantastic Four was pushed into publication because DC Comics was making a mint off of Justice League. However, what prevented these characters from being knock-offs and made them icons were the artists who brought them to life on the page.

      Sure, Stan said some things that needed to be said at the time they needed saying. He also breathed life into an industry that was still walking funny after being neutered by the Comics Authority Code. When it came to social issues he was quite vocal. However, as a businessman, he took all of the credit for everything while his co-creators languished in poverty, or died before they got their proper recognition. As a writer, he was derivative, especially of his own material.

      He was a guy who was in the right place at the right time. There's a reason why nobody thinks fondly of anything Stan created prior to 1961 and after 1968 -- because all the ideas were ranging from "meh" to "awful". If you don't believe me, look up Father Time, Stripperella, and "Just Imagine". He had a brief moment of positively received creativity and that was it. Why we choose to remember him in this way (As opposed to Steve Ditko, Jack Kirby, Archie Goodwin, Gene Colan, Herb Trimpe, Dave Cockrum, or any of the countless others who have died) is because Stan marketed and sold his own persona. He wasn't a person anymore, he made himself a product that could charge top dollar.

      I'm sorrynotsorry if this tramples on anyone's grief, but that's the reality of the guy. He wasn't perfect. He was an [butthole] and a crook sometimes. He said some really good things here and there and wrote a few good stories, but mourning him makes me feel sick because of who he became as a businessman and a person.

      I'd like to see the reaction of Stan's daughters and others at that. To be honest, you are right - he did do some bad things. But he's dead. There'll never be another Stan Lee. And he gave us so much. You could at least wait until later to type a whole annoyance to me down.

      And, alright, maybe Ditko wasn't mentioned but if you asked a kid or adult who had no idea about comics who they knew, they probably would say "Stan Lee" before anyone else.

      Remember: this is a Marvel database, and Steve Ditko didn't do as much for Marvel as Stan.

      Also, Stan wrote pretty much every comic in the early 60s. That's a big task. And yet he still didn't write Peter Parker's name as Tony Stark (I hope...)

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    • Nausiated wrote: His passing doesn't come as a shock to me. He was 95 years old. He lived a long life. So some of the grief expressed above is histrionic in my opinion. Also, unlike most, his passing doesn't fill me with sadness.

      Etc, etc, etc...

      Back when Steve Ditko died, we talked about it and homaged him for days in the Discord server. I created this thread because I saw a demand from the community to express their grief over Stan Lee's death. I personally didn't think it was necessary, but I figured it would probably be odd if the Marvel Database didn't do anything considering the status of Stan Lee as a pop culture icon and the fact that every media outlet is lamenting his passing. This is the reason this thread was posted today and not yesterday.

      I understand the desire to keep the record straight and clarify the true place of Stan Lee in history, especially when compared to the kind of recognition (or lack thereof) creators like Jack Kirby and Steve Ditko have received from the general public, but I don't see this as being the appropriate place.

      Stan Lee was flawed and did bad things (though he did make amends as well), but neither was he a monster to the point people shouldn't be allowed to feel even remotely sad that he passed away. I think there should be a balance between putting Stan in a shining pedestal and demonizing him. And being cynical and tearing him down, especially in a context meant to honor him doesn't show wisdom but ill-intent.

      What is really nauseating is that you have to chastise people for expressing genuine grief even if they don't know the full picture, especially in such a condescending and contemptuous way.

      And that's all I'll say about it.

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    • He truly was The Man. RIP Stan, you will be greatly missed.

      @Nausiated: You're entitled to your opinion, but time and place, dude. You don't have to love him, but we do.

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    • Stan Lee’s gone?😢

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    • I'll miss you "Man" Stan. Excelsior

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    • Well firstly I would like to say Rest in Peace to Mr. Lee and my best wishes to his family in their time of grief. secondly I would like to thank Mr. Lee and everyone at Marvel Comics for all there work in the comic book industry and for their collaboration with the cinematic industry over the years. Thirdly I would like to wish Marvel Comics the best of luck with the transition from perhaps one of the most iconic men in the comic book industry. Fourthly I personally hope that even without Mr. Lee that Marvel Comics and the comic industry as a whole will not lose its way in the years to come. If that should happen I hear the industry will lose sight of the purpose it serves not only among the worlds comic fans but also for the sake of those who take inspiration from the various and varied characters the Comics portrayed.

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    • Marvel Remembers the Legacy of Stan Lee

      Marvel Remembers the Legacy of Stan Lee

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    • R.I.P. Stan Lee. Comic book fans and moviegoers everywhere will miss you.

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    • "Even then, of all the comics he wrote, I'd say that there are only 100 worth reading (and trust me, I've read them all). Even then less than 20 are what I would call legendary, brilliant, or even ahead of the times."

      Personally, I prefer stories by Roy Thomas, Steve Englehart, Chris Claremont, and John Marc DeMatteis to those by Stan Lee. They fleshed out the characters more and added some depth to their personalities.

      But I find several of Lee's old stories highly entertaining. They had their plot holes, but they also had a decent mix of comedy and drama, and introduced many intriguing characters. I am particularly fond of the early X-Men issues, which were introducing new characters in almost every issue. I also like the 1960s Daredevil villains.

      "His ideas were borrowed or outright stolen from other sources (the Fantastic Four were a rip off of the Challenger of the Unknown"

      Really? I don't see much of a resemblance. The original Challengers consisted of an "Olympic wrestling champion", a "master skin diver", a "circus daredevil",, and a "jet pilot". No brilliant scientist, no deformed strongman, no sexy woman, no teenage tag-along kid. June Robbins (the only woman in the series) was an "honorary member and peripheral character.

      The character dynamic of the Fantastic Four better resembled the Sea Devils (introduced in 1960). "They were Dane Dorrance (handsome, brainy, designed to look like a leader), Biff Bailey (big'n'strong, street-smart, ruggedly good looking), Judy Walton (Dane's love interest) and Nicky Walton (Judy's younger brother). If the structure — leader, right-hand man, girlfriend, her kid brother — sounds like something you've seen before, that's because you've seen it before, in various media. Its most famous use in comics was The Fantastic Four back before they let Johnny grow up." See: http://www.toonopedia.com/seadevls.htm

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    • Damn betcha. I still can't believe it. The guy looks like he'll live a long life. I mean he did, at 95, but I swear he looks like a man who will live to be 100, and he'd still have that smile of his, and that "Excelsior!" phrase. Who could forget that? Dude was one of my real-life idols, honest to God, and I deeply regret never meeting him. The guy was a legend. I loved him. We loved him. The world loved him. He was a living legend, and we should always remember and respect the effort and love he did to us fans. If he never made many of those Marvel characters there, Marvel would surely be down in the dumps, and it wouldn't be nearly as enjoyable as it is. I just can't believe it. I don't think anyone did. But he lived a great life, that's all there is to it. So, I just want to give a little shoutout to everyone who loves Marvel: Stan Lee, you are the man who gave life to Marvel. Without you, this fandom here would probably never exist. You are a legend in your own right. You're not perfect, but that's okay, because deep down, we are all human. You are the person who made Marvel ours, and for that, we thank you deeply for it. We thank you for everything. And we thank you, Mr. Lee, for being Marvel as a whole. You will be missed, man. You have our love, our respect, our happiness, and our deepest thanks. Thank you so much for entering our lives and making it excelsior.

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    • GoGoPowerRangers4791 wrote: Damn betcha. I still can't believe it. The guy looks like he'll live a long life. I mean he did, at 95, but I swear he looks like a man who will live to be 100, and he'd still have that smile of his, and that "Excelsior!" phrase. Who could forget that? Dude was one of my real-life idols, honest to God, and I deeply regret never meeting him.

      I know how you feel. I was nearly in shock when Carl Barks died back in 2000, despite the fact that he was 99-years-old and his death was not unexpected. He had created so many of my favorite characters, and I loved the philosophy behind his comic book stories. A year before he died, he wrote a poem about his characters and stories, the "Ode to the Disney Ducks". I feel it fits several other characters and storytellers, including the Marvel ones:

      "Ode to the Disney Ducks They ride tall ships to the far away, and see the long ago. They walk where fabled people trod, and Yetis trod the snow.

      They meet the folks who live on stars, and find them much like us, With food and love and happiness the things they most discuss.

      The world is full of clans and cults abuzz as angry bees, And Junior Woodchucks snapping jeers at Littlest Chickadees.

      The ducks show us that part of life is to forgive a slight. That black eyes given in revenge keep hatred burning bright.

      So when our walks in sun or shade pass graveyards filled by wars, It's nice to stop and read of ducks whose battles leave no scars.

      To read of ducks who parody our vain attempts at glory, They don't exist, but somehow leave us glad we bought their story."

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    • That was beautiful man, but if you don't mind me asking, what exactly are you going with that?

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    • It is I poem I tend to recall when another good writer dies. When another door closes.

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    • How long until Marvel bring Stan back from the dead? You and I both know that superheroes do not stay dead in the Marvel universe, Stan Lee is too important to stay dead. I say that Marvel will bring him back in his own comic book and then make a major motion picture based on the character.

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    • I miss Stan Lee lot please bring him back from death please!!!

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    • You're only one marvel's father. Exelsior! Exelsior optimum!

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    • Oh God... I still can't believe... Rest in piece, Stan. I just want to say thank you for everyrhing you've done for us. We'll never forget you.

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    • "With great power comes great responsibility", one of the most memorable quotes second to "Exelsior"!!.

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    • Mine

      Minor modification to make it appropriate.

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    • I remember when I was a kid (like, seven years old, I believe I was?), I used to be a somewhat problematic guy. Basically no friends, no physical aptitude whatsoever, carefree, hooked to videogames, prone to violent behavior, etcetera. I would play Spider-Man 2 all day, but without any knowledge of who Spider-Man was, or why he had his powers, why he did what he did, or anything. Back then, to me, Spider-Man was simply a videogame character. Then, one day, out of nowhere, after school, my mother walked up to me with a book. It was a hardcover compiling of Amazing Spider-Man Vol 1, Issues 143-150, with the first two pages of Issue 151 included as well. I had only seen Spider-Man in the aforementioned videogame before, so this was a surprise. I opened the book to see how it was like and I saw a double-page splash of Spider-Man fighting Tarantula in the streets of New York, using his agility to jump over the villain. The image (which, thanks to this Wiki, I now know is from Issue 147) will forever be etched into my mind. Ever since then, I've been a comic book fan, reading and buying every comic book I could get my eyes and hands on. Over the years, not only did I learn all about Uncle Ben, the robber whom Spider-Man let escape, George and Gwen Stacy, Ben Reilly, etcetera, but seeing Spider-Man use his powers to be responsible motivated me to change myself. I stopped being violent (which took a lot of effort), tried to make friends (that part failed back then, but it's going a bit better now), became somewhat more responsible and so on.

      Where am I going with this? Well, basically, if it wasn't for the work Stan Lee did all those decades back, in 1962, I would've never become who I am today. Sure, he didn't write the issues I previously mentioned, but his work ensured someone would. For that, I am truly grateful.

      Thank you, Stan Lee. You taught me that with great power comes great responsibility.

      Excelsior.

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    • I will miss the way his voice narrated sentences and phrases especially when they started with the same letter(s).

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    • Don't forget about his wonderful sense of humor.

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    • Angel1985
      Angel1985 removed this reply because:
      No longer desire to have it here.
      20:04, November 20, 2018
      This reply has been removed
    • Very funny. Do you seriously think this is a joke?

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    • I would just like to say that he has contributed a lot to my childhood. I had been collecting spiderman comics since I was 10 years old. If it had not been for him I would not have been fond of comics and I would not have tried to reproduce them by my own hand. Part of my adolescent fantasy is due to one of his creations in which I often see myself as a character. I think a thank you is due for this, because it has contributed a lot to my imagination. Perhaps he was more hero than of those I read. Thanks Stan. 'Nuff said and Excelsior!

      Here I place my tribute

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    • It hurts my heart to see Stan Lee passed away two days ago. ABC news talked about him in their video,[1]. The good news is before he died, they have him appear in Avengers 4 and his legacy will forever be unforgotten.

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    • GoGoPowerRangers4791 wrote: Very funny. Do you seriously think this is a joke?

      I'm NOT joking; just want to show my sincere sympathy.

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    • Deeaa wrote: I miss Stan Lee lot please bring him back from death please!!!

      In comics he can come back whenever the creators so desire. But we don't have the means to actually bring back anyone from the dead, not yet. Though that does actually remind me of something: What will Marvel be like now that he's gone? Guy was the face of Marvel. What will happen to it? What will happen to its legacy? Its meaning? What will happen to this fandom? What will happen to the movies? His cameos are what really make any of his movies memorable, by far. Without it, what will happen to the quality of the movies future to come? What will become the future of Marvel?

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    • GoGoPowerRangers4791 wrote:

      Deeaa wrote: I miss Stan Lee lot please bring him back from death please!!!

      In comics he can come back whenever the creators so desire. But we don't have the means to actually bring back anyone from the dead, not yet. Though that does actually remind me of something: What will Marvel be like now that he's gone? Guy was the face of Marvel. What will happen to it? What will happen to its legacy? Its meaning? What will happen to this fandom? What will happen to the movies? His cameos are what really make any of his movies memorable, by far. Without it, what will happen to the quality of the movies future to come? What will become the future of Marvel?

      We have other magnificent artists and comics like Marvel, sure. Sonic, Fables, TMNT, DC, but nothing, NOTHING can match Marvel. Nor Stan Lee's brilliance. Hell, did you guys know he actually made a cartoon series, Stripperella? I'm not kidding you guys, he did.

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    • Yeah, Lee was a textbook definition of a legend, I bet there's no way to summarize the pain caused by his passing. He left quite a legacy behind but he's still alive in our hearts. Only time will tell what direction Marvel will head to after his passing.

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    • Without Lee, Marvel will never rise again. And you all know that. So there is only one thing to do. It is with a heavy heart that I officially resign from Marvel altogether. My love for it died when he did. I hope you all manage to keep this fandom together, hell, I hope Marvel will manage, period, now that its legend has now passed. Thank you all for your time, and I appreciate your efforts. I only ask that you please block my edits indefinitely to seal me leaving this fandom. I wish you and Marvel good luck, and I love each and every one of Marvel's work.

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    • GoGoPowerRangers4791 wrote: Without Lee, Marvel will never rise again. And you all know that. So there is only one thing to do. It is with a heavy heart that I officially resign from Marvel altogether. My love for it died when he did. I hope you all manage to keep this fandom together, hell, I hope Marvel will manage, period, now that its legend has now passed. Thank you all for your time, and I appreciate your efforts. I only ask that you please block my edits indefinitely to seal me leaving this fandom. I wish you and Marvel good luck, and I love each and every one of Marvel's work.

      Stan Lee hasn't been involved in Marvel Comics for decades. Marvel moved away from him a long time ago, and all he was at the moment of his death was a face-value living legend within the comic community already past his prime. The only difference now is that Stan Lee's presence will be a fond memory.

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    • Understood. But just do as I say. Marvel hasn't been the same for me anymore.

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    • RIP Stan Lee, thank you for the many years of joy and happiness you brought to us, you will be dearly missed... :-(

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    • GoGoPowerRangers4791 wrote: Without Lee, Marvel will never rise again. And you all know that. So there is only one thing to do. It is with a heavy heart that I officially resign from Marvel altogether. My love for it died when he did. I hope you all manage to keep this fandom together, hell, I hope Marvel will manage, period, now that its legend has now passed. Thank you all for your time, and I appreciate your efforts. I only ask that you please block my edits indefinitely to seal me leaving this fandom. I wish you and Marvel good luck, and I love each and every one of Marvel's work.

      What did I just read? I just came here to read everyone's posts about Stan Lee and suddenly this appeared. How is this a way to honor his legacy? By disowning it? What sense does that make? That's really disrespectful that you think this is how things should be. Stan wouldn't want this.

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    • RIP Stan Lee 1922-2018

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    • Stan Lee EXcelsior

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    • Already immortal within our hearts, being our hero within.

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    • I'm still reeling from this. Stan meant and still means a great deal to me. I live my life the way I do because of the teachings he lay down in his works.

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    • Zakor1138 wrote:

      GoGoPowerRangers4791 wrote: Without Lee, Marvel will never rise again. And you all know that. So there is only one thing to do. It is with a heavy heart that I officially resign from Marvel altogether. My love for it died when he did. I hope you all manage to keep this fandom together, hell, I hope Marvel will manage, period, now that its legend has now passed. Thank you all for your time, and I appreciate your efforts. I only ask that you please block my edits indefinitely to seal me leaving this fandom. I wish you and Marvel good luck, and I love each and every one of Marvel's work.

      What did I just read? I just came here to read everyone's posts about Stan Lee and suddenly this appeared. How is this a way to honor his legacy? By disowning it? What sense does that make? That's really disrespectful that you think this is how things should be. Stan wouldn't want this.

      Say what you like. This is how things should be.

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    • See you Stan. We will miss you.

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    • Rest in peace. great master. Your legacy will never be forgotten.

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    • I'm gonna miss this guy so much. He inspired me to create worlds too, and i hope me and many others carry on your spirit and ideas so that you never truly die. You are our Captain Excelsior. Now fly home, your people need you.

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    • ADour
      ADour removed this reply because:
      I guess.
      19:55, November 15, 2018
      This reply has been removed
    • We'll ALWAYS remember you.

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    • I and Marvel fans will mourn for you.

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    • Angel1985
      Angel1985 removed this reply because:
      Offensive behavior.
      20:13, November 20, 2018
      This reply has been removed
    • Angel1985 wrote: Is that a threat; make my day punk!

      Who said it was a threat? I admire Stan Lee a lot and he is the popular legendary writer that Marvel has ever had.

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    • PgSentFlying wrote:

      Angel1985 wrote: Is that a threat; make my day punk!

      Who said it was a threat? I admire Stan Lee a lot and he is the popular legendary writer that Marvel has ever had.

      I think he's just joking

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    • It is truly the end of an era. May God give him his blissful afterlife.

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    • My favorite incarnation of Stan was the one from the Ultimate Spider-Man show.

      He had a more recurring role than any other show and by the episode "Stan by Me", he's a more central character rather than just a cameo. In the same episode, he totally kicked ass and had a fleshed out backstory, plus he becomes a mentor figure to Spidey. And the cherry on top was that he "fourth wall bombs" Peter with his catchphrase; Excelsior!.

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    • I can see him in the cameo all the time.

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    • K.Earl03 wrote: So sad, I've always wanted to meet Stan Lee, always. And now that he is gone, the only time i will be able to see him is when i die and go to heaven if at all. Stan definitely went to Heaven cause of all the good he did to entertain us and himself. He didn't deserve to die, i don't know anyone that hated him. Even his competitor (DC Comics) sent him respects for his death. If Disney doesn't put their heads together and start doing good for Marvel I will honestly get so mad at Disney.

      You very much are right about that, he did a lot of good and great good for the world of comics, for superheroes, and he shaped comic culture as we know it to be.

      He did not deserve to die, the best way we can honor the legacy of this man is our continued support of his work and the works of his competitors.

      There really is not much hate that can be levied on him, the guy did so much good where there truly isn't a named circumstance where bad can be defined within him at all.

      Even DC comics "A WarnerMedia Company" sent their deepest condolences for his passing showing even they deeply respect the guy and the good he did to this world.

      As this is a very sad time for The Walt Disney Company (Marvel Entertainment LLC's owner since 2009), they very much are aware they are going to have to get their heads together and start doing good for Marvel and the MCU and for the animation division, and for Marvel TV and all of the marvel verse in entertainment that is known or otherwise will be known.

      Disney has a lot planned for Marvel, a lot has been lined up for Disney+ for the brand both on that front and theatrically, Disney will certainly keep busy and honor the mans memory.

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    • Without him, the world wouldn't have awesome comics. He made us a great childhood.

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    • RIP.

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    • It was a tragedy to lose Stan Lee.

      Rest in peace Stan.

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    • He died a year after her wife passed away. Is that a coincidence?

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    • Spidey be damned if he doesn’t rest in peace.

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    • Will JC Lee earn all his money and use it like in the past?

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    • Zeus Destroy wrote: Will JC Lee earn all his money and use it like in the past?

      If he wrote something in his will that prevents manipulation of the money by JC Lee, than the estate can legally go after JC Lee and sue if it has not chosen to write a clause preventing JC Lee from carrying out certain kinds of actions against the lee estate and so forth

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    • Girlmeetsfan1 wrote:

      Zeus Destroy wrote: Will JC Lee earn all his money and use it like in the past?

      If he wrote something in his will that prevents manipulation of the money by JC Lee, than the estate can legally go after JC Lee and sue if it has not chosen to write a clause preventing JC Lee from carrying out certain kinds of actions against the lee estate and so forth

      oh ok. Because I remember JC Lee did awful stuff with Stan's money

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    • As much as I would miss him, at least they don't have to shoehorn the same old man into every Marvel movie anymore. You know, after a while the same joke would end up being more annoying than funny. I find it disgusting that Marvel had literally cameo'ed Stan to death. They were even filming his cameos in pre-production because he was getting too old. My Gods, why can't they just let him retire? He's in one scene in each movie and he's not even playing the same character! And he's never in the marketing of any movie other than Deadpool 2. Why would these movie need him? These movies are enjoyable on their own even if you cut Stan's scene from the film. And his cameo in Thor: Ragnarok actually ruined Thor's haircut for me. Let's hope his Captain Marvel and Avengers 4 cameos don't ruin him after death. Rest in Peace Stan Lee. Seriously, you need to rest. You've been through enough cameos for one lifetime. Stan Lee has practically become a Chuck Norris joke.

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    • Beautiful

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    • I think that the cameos were a joke that Stan Lee thought of. He probably wanted to do them because a lot of people liked them and wouldn't have done them unless he wanted to do them.

      Rest in peace, Stan Lee. We will all miss you here. May your spirit reside in Valhalla with all your heroes and your legacy live on with us, forever. You are loved and viewed as much a hero as your characters that you created.

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    • Hero346 wrote: I think that the cameos were a joke that Stan Lee thought of. He probably wanted to do them because a lot of people liked them and wouldn't have done them unless he wanted to do them.

      Rest in peace, Stan Lee. We will all miss you here. May your spirit reside in Valhalla with all your heroes and your legacy live on with us, forever. You are loved and viewed as much a hero as your characters that you created.

      Vahalla or Olympus? Both are "heavens" right?

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    • Yea I figured he had more affiliations with Valhalla, what with Thor and Loki.

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    • Unlike DC comic book writers, who are barely known for creating the popular characters like Superman, Batman, Wonder woman, Flash, Green Lantern, and several others. Stan Lee is a very famous man who will always be the legendary comic book writer in Marvel.

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    • PgSentFlying wrote: Unlike DC comic book writers, who are barely known for creating the popular characters like Superman, Batman, Wonder woman, Flash, Green Lantern, and several others. Stan Lee is a very famous man who will always be the legendary comic book writer in Marvel.

      True. I never remember their names at all.

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    • PgSentFlying wrote: Unlike DC comic book writers, who are barely known for creating the popular characters like Superman, Batman, Wonder woman, Flash, Green Lantern, and several others. Stan Lee is a very famous man who will always be the legendary comic book writer in Marvel.

      The problem with DC and its characters is that each character had a different creator. Jerry Siegel and Joe Shuster created Superman, Bob Kane created Batman and so on. Not saying they're not important, mind you, but it tends to be difficult to keep track of who created who. On the other hand, most of Marvel's most iconic characters were created by The Man. No matter who drew them at first, it was a single person that wrote their first adventures. That way, Marvel will always have Stan Lee as a "face" of sorts.

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    • he was a remarkable man, and me will greatly be missed

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    • Omegasonic2000 wrote:

      PgSentFlying wrote: Unlike DC comic book writers, who are barely known for creating the popular characters like Superman, Batman, Wonder woman, Flash, Green Lantern, and several others. Stan Lee is a very famous man who will always be the legendary comic book writer in Marvel.

      The problem with DC and its characters is that each character had a different creator. Jerry Siegel and Joe Shuster created Superman, Bob Kane created Batman and so on. Not saying they're not important, mind you, but it tends to be difficult to keep track of who created who. On the other hand, most of Marvel's most iconic characters were created by The Man. No matter who drew them at first, it was a single person that wrote their first adventures. That way, Marvel will always have Stan Lee as a "face" of sorts.

      That too is hard to remember them.

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    • And William Moulton Marsden created Wonder Woman and invented the lie detector.

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    • Zeus Destroy wrote:

      Omegasonic2000 wrote:

      PgSentFlying wrote: Unlike DC comic book writers, who are barely known for creating the popular characters like Superman, Batman, Wonder woman, Flash, Green Lantern, and several others. Stan Lee is a very famous man who will always be the legendary comic book writer in Marvel.

      The problem with DC and its characters is that each character had a different creator. Jerry Siegel and Joe Shuster created Superman, Bob Kane created Batman and so on. Not saying they're not important, mind you, but it tends to be difficult to keep track of who created who. On the other hand, most of Marvel's most iconic characters were created by The Man. No matter who drew them at first, it was a single person that wrote their first adventures. That way, Marvel will always have Stan Lee as a "face" of sorts.

      That too is hard to remember them.

      Like Zeus Destroy said DC Comics writers are hard to remember, but when Marvel Comics comes to the stage, a legendary comic writer, Stan Lee will always be too easy to remember for people in the world.

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    • PgSentFlying wrote:

      Zeus Destroy wrote:

      Omegasonic2000 wrote:

      PgSentFlying wrote: Unlike DC comic book writers, who are barely known for creating the popular characters like Superman, Batman, Wonder woman, Flash, Green Lantern, and several others. Stan Lee is a very famous man who will always be the legendary comic book writer in Marvel.

      The problem with DC and its characters is that each character had a different creator. Jerry Siegel and Joe Shuster created Superman, Bob Kane created Batman and so on. Not saying they're not important, mind you, but it tends to be difficult to keep track of who created who. On the other hand, most of Marvel's most iconic characters were created by The Man. No matter who drew them at first, it was a single person that wrote their first adventures. That way, Marvel will always have Stan Lee as a "face" of sorts.

      That too is hard to remember them.

      Like Zeus Destroy said DC Comics writers are hard to remember, but when Marvel Comics comes to the stage, a legendary comic writer, Stan Lee will always be too easy to remember for people in the world.

      I only remember Bob Kane lmao. Because I use a stupid trick to remember it easily: Sponge Bob (my favorite childhood show) and Citizen Kane (a movie I like).

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    • Marvel Comics will always make sense and will always be better than DC Comics. Stan Lee make the difference. Perfect job, Stan Lee.

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    • Even though Bill Finger did more to make Batman what he is than Bob Kane ever did.

      Let's not use Stan Lee's passing to crap on DC for no reason. Especially when a person like Finger didn't even get proper credit until the 2010's. Seems a bit disrespectful.

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    • Zakor1138 wrote: Even though Bill Finger did more to make Batman what he is than Bob Kane ever did.

      Let's not use Stan Lee's passing to crap on DC for no reason. Especially when a person like Finger didn't even get proper credit until the 2010's. Seems a bit disrespectful.

      Huh

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    • And of course, the reason why we would always remember Stan Lee better than any other comic creators is that he would always force his cameo everywhere. It's gotten to a point where I liked Jar Jar Binks better than him. Though to be fair, I never had any problems with Jar Jar. But creators don't need to put themselves into every story. JK Rowling never appeared in a Harry Potter film. And let's not forget how we always had to save Stan Lee in the LEGO Marvel games to unlock him and find out that he has the powers to save himself. But now that he's dead, I guess I would need to respect him more, but I think he really should have just retired from cameos. Especially when they had to film him in pre-production for the last few movies. And now a tradition of an MCU film will break after Spider-Man: Far From Home because Stan Lee isn't around to make any more mandatory cameos.

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    • SeanWheeler wrote: And of course, the reason why we would always remember Stan Lee better than any other comic creators is that he would always force his cameo everywhere. It's gotten to a point where I liked Jar Jar Binks better than him. Though to be fair, I never had any problems with Jar Jar. But creators don't need to put themselves into every story. JK Rowling never appeared in a Harry Potter film. And let's not forget how we always had to save Stan Lee in the LEGO Marvel games to unlock him and find out that he has the powers to save himself. But now that he's dead, I guess I would need to respect him more, but I think he really should have just retired from cameos. Especially when they had to film him in pre-production for the last few movies. And now a tradition of an MCU film will break after Spider-Man: Far From Home because Stan Lee isn't around to make any more mandatory cameos.

      Jeez, tell us what you really think...

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    • Farewell stan lee until next time

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    • Rest in Peace Stan Lee. You really need it. And yes, we will all miss you.

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    • https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=kpj-VLduJSw&index=6&list=PL8D92393BACD4F09D&t=0s rest Stan Lee we all miss you This song is for stan

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    • Zakor1138 wrote: Even though Bill Finger did more to make Batman what he is than Bob Kane ever did.

      Let's not use Stan Lee's passing to crap on DC for no reason. Especially when a person like Finger didn't even get proper credit until the 2010's. Seems a bit disrespectful.

      It is never disrespectful if you are talking about a honorable man, Stan Lee who earned the National Honor Award Medal from President Bush in 2008.

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    • PgSentFlying wrote:

      Zakor1138 wrote: Even though Bill Finger did more to make Batman what he is than Bob Kane ever did.

      Let's not use Stan Lee's passing to crap on DC for no reason. Especially when a person like Finger didn't even get proper credit until the 2010's. Seems a bit disrespectful.

      It is never disrespectful if you are talking about a honorable man, Stan Lee who earned the National Honor Award Medal from President Bush in 2008.

      It's not disrespectful to talk about a deceased person. It is disrespectful to use his death in order to throw shade at his contemporaries. Keep in mind, Stan Lee did DC work as well, and they themselves also paid tribute to his death. https://www.dccomics.com/blog/2018/11/12/dc-remembers-stan-lee-1922-2018

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    • Stan Lee left a legacy that will live on for generations to come and he will be remembered as a legend. May he find peace in the afterlife RIP Stan Lee. nuff said

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    • If there is even an afterlife... I always thought of death as being a state where you're permanently blind, deaf, numb, paralyzed, amnesiac, unable to think or feel, not even able to dream. You wouldn't experience anything because your brain wouldn't be working. The white light people described from their near death experiences was just their brains rebooting when the doctors save them. Okay, maybe this is too sensitive. But if what I believe is correct, the poor guy has lost everything. *sobs* Curse you science and logic! Man, I so want a heaven, but the way everything you experience has to go through your brain and how you die when your brain breaks... *cries in the corner*

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    • SeanWheeler wrote: If there is even an afterlife... I always thought of death as being a state where you're permanently blind, deaf, numb, paralyzed, amnesiac, unable to think or feel, not even able to dream. You wouldn't experience anything because your brain wouldn't be working. The white light people described from their near death experiences was just their brains rebooting when the doctors save them. Okay, maybe this is too sensitive. But if what I believe is correct, the poor guy has lost everything. *sobs* Curse you science and logic! Man, I so want a heaven, but the way everything you experience has to go through your brain and how you die when your brain breaks... *cries in the corner*

      Um, you can stop now.

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    • Okay, sorry...

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    • SeanWheeler wrote: If there is even an afterlife... I always thought of death as being a state where you're permanently blind, deaf, numb, paralyzed, amnesiac, unable to think or feel, not even able to dream. You wouldn't experience anything because your brain wouldn't be working. The white light people described from their near death experiences was just their brains rebooting when the doctors save them. Okay, maybe this is too sensitive. But if what I believe is correct, the poor guy has lost everything. *sobs* Curse you science and logic! Man, I so want a heaven, but the way everything you experience has to go through your brain and how you die when your brain breaks... *cries in the corner*

      I kinda feel the same way. It helped to re-read The Death Of Captain Marvel enen though Stan Lee did not write it. Excelsior!

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    • Even when Stan Lee's legacy will continue to no end. I will still miss him.

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    • Some additional details regarding Lee's post-mortem. Lee's cause of death has been confirmed as heart and respiratory failure, potentially caused by his pneumonia earlier this year. Also, his remains have been cremated, and are now possessed by his daughter J.C. Lee.

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    • May he rest in peace with his wife and friends in a better place.

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    • SeanWheeler wrote: If there is even an afterlife... I always thought of death as being a state where you're permanently blind, deaf, numb, paralyzed, amnesiac, unable to think or feel, not even able to dream. You wouldn't experience anything because your brain wouldn't be working. The white light people described from their near death experiences was just their brains rebooting when the doctors save them. Okay, maybe this is too sensitive. But if what I believe is correct, the poor guy has lost everything. *sobs* Curse you science and logic! Man, I so want a heaven, but the way everything you experience has to go through your brain and how you die when your brain breaks... *cries in the corner*

      On the one hand, I'm happy to see I'm not the only one who thinks like that. On the other, just thinking about it... *cries*

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    • I feel like enough time has passed for people to pay their respects. So I'll be closing this thread later today.

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    • In that case, here are some final thoughts: We've lost a lot of people recently. Stan Lee, Stephen Hillenburg, George Bush, and plenty of others who I can't recall, or who maybe are involved in your personal lives. You may or may not have had a close connection to these people. If you did, please stay strong. The world will always have a connection to these people and their creations, and while they may be gone, their legacy will extend even beyond our own lifetimes. And if you didn't, please try to be respectful. None of these men were perfect (okay, maybe Hillenburg was), but they ultimately did some good for the world. It's not worth demeaning an entire person just for a few sins: you have to focus on the good and the bad as separate entities, especially in death. Overall, all of these men had an impact on my life, and I wish them good luck in the afterlife.

      RIP

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    • It feels like we're losing every famous VIPs this year...

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