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Quote1 This man was a friend of mine... a decorated American hero... Quote2
-- Winter Soldier src
 
Although technically originally introduced in Marvel publications in the 1970's,[3] various retcons of the history of Captain America have expanded the history of Fred Davis Jr. to span publications published over 70 years. Below is his abridged history. For an abridged version, see Fred Davis Jr.'s Expanded History

New York Yankees

In 1942 Fred Davis was a bat-boy for the New York Yankees. The Invaders had been captured and brainwashed, leaving only Bucky free. As part of a plan to capture the mind-controlled heroes, Bucky asked Fred to impersonate him, which the patriotic lad did without hesitation.[3]

Fred Davis (Earth-616)

Fred as Bucky

Partners with William Nasland

Three years later, Bucky and Captain America were reportedly killed. President Truman realized that the news of their deaths could be a severe blow to allied morale and asked William Nasland, the hero known as the Spirit of '76, to assume the identity of Captain America and for Fred to once more wear the costume of Bucky and operate alongside the Invaders to maintain the pretense that America's premiere heroes were still alive. The new Captain America and Bucky finished the rest of the war and continued to fight crime with the All-Winners Squad. Naslund was killed in 1946 fighting the android Adam II, and Captain America's identity passed to Jeffrey Mace, the Patriot.[4]

Partners with Jeff Mace

Davis assisted Mace until 1948, when he was shot and wounded, forcing him to retire and leaving him with a permanent limp.[5]

V-Battalion

In 1951, Davis joined the V-Battalion, a secret organization that hunted war criminals, and eventually became one of its leaders on the Penance Council. He served the V-Battalion in both a leadership role in the Penance Council, and as an engineer.[6]

Death

[7]

Abilities

As Bucky, he was well trained in hand-to-hand combat and acrobatics.

Strength level

Bucky possessed the normal human strength of someone his age, height, and build who engaged in intensive regular exercise.



  • Fred Davis was invented in the 70's to retroactively explain why Bucky (and Captain America) appeared in comics dated after 1945 and their encounter with Zemo's bomb-rocket. As a result, there is no officially recognized point when Fred Davis replaced Bucky Barnes in the original Timely Comics stories of Captain America. Based on the dates involved, however, Captain America Comics #49 is often recognized as the first Fred Davis story.

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